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When to See a Pelvic Health Physical Therapist

Bladder and Bowel Conditions

Bowel and bladder issues can range from being a little annoying to completely debilitating.

They can leave you embarrassed and socially isolated.

Bowel and bladder incontinence is one of the reasons young girls stop participating in sports as well as one of the first reasons for nursing home admission.  The good news is that physical therapy can help – whether you are 13 or 93.

Beyond incontinence, people’s lives can also be negatively affected by urinary and fecal urgency, constipation and the inability to completely empty.

Our therapists know how embarrassing and painful these conditions can be, are they here to help you feel better.

If you are suffering from any of symptoms below, we can help.

Physical Therapy after Breast Cancer

Studies indicate that women who have received breast cancer treatment experience muscle weakness. This includes muscles that were not in the surgical or radiated field.

Many of the musculoskeletal side effects of breast cancer treatment can be improved and even avoided by receiving physical therapy.

In fact, women who receive physical therapy treatment after breast cancer surgery show improvement in range of motion and flexibility faster than those who do not receive physical therapy.

Osteoporosis and Osteopenia

Osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by thinning and decreased strength of the bones and changes in the structure of the bone itself.

Osteopenia is very similar to osteoporosis, but at an earlier stage of bone loss.

If you picture a line or scale to describe the strength of bone then normal bone would be located at one end of a scale, osteoporosis at the other end of the scale, and osteopenia somewhere in the middle.

Although they can occur at any age, osteoporosis and osteopenia begin most frequently during the first five years of menopause. In fact, approximately 50% of women will break a bone due to osteoporosis at some point in their lifetime.

However, younger women and even children can be at risk to developing osteoporosis or osteopenia if they:

  • have certain other diseases affecting bone development (such as Celiac Disease or Irritable Bowel Syndrome)
  • are taking steroids on a regular basis
  • are an underweight athlete during the peak years of bone development.

Whatever your age, research studies show that physical therapy treatment can help teach you how to keep your bones healthy and help you to avoid fractures.

Orthopedic Program

Our physical therapists also treat clients with back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain and hip pain.

Pain or dysfunction in these areas can adversely affect your quality of life by limiting the way you function or causing you to discontinue certain activities.

The good news is these problems can be effectively treated with physical therapy and we’re here to help.

Vestibular (Vertigo)

Physical therapy can help treat Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, commonly known as vertigo.

TMJ (Temporomandibular Joint Disorders)

Popping, pain or locking up in the jaw with yawning, eating, biting and chewing can be common, but it’s not normal and is very treatable.

We often hold our stress in our faces, and this can translate to clenching the jaw and/or grinding the teeth during the day and even in our sleep.

Jaw pain can radiate into the ear, neck and even the shoulder blade.

You can also experience the jaw locking when you open or close your mouth.

This can be quite painful and require manual assistance to release.

You may also be unable to chew or bite into hard foods and are restricted to a “soft diet” to avoid symptoms.

Prolapse Treatment Program

A prolapse is a body part or organ which has slipped forward or down into or past the opening of the vaginal canal or anus; might be referred to as a rectocele/rectal prolapse, cystocele/bladder prolapse, urethrocele/urethral prolapse, enterocele/small bowel prolapse, uterine prolapse, or vaginal vault prolapse depending on which organ is dropping downward. This is due to weakness in the fascia and ligaments of the pelvis. While physical therapy cannot fix your prolapse, it a proven way to decrease and in some cases eliminate the issues that your prolapse creates.

Pregnancy and Postpartum

Pain and other issues during or after pregnancy is common, but it’s not normal. Don’t let these problems take away from the wonderful experience of your new arrival.

When a woman goes through a pregnancy and delivers a baby, her pelvic floor muscles, fascia and nerves are put through the wringer.

Pelvic floor physical therapy can easily treat many birth-related issues – even if it’s been years since the birth.

Pre and Post Surgical Programs

Our physical therapists believe that you get the best outcomes with pelvic surgeries when pelvic floor physical therapy is incorporated both before and after surgery.

This includes work to reduce muscle spasms, and improve pelvic floor relaxation and contraction.

We may also work on breathing, posture, alignment and coordination.

Most importantly, we believe that education is paramount, and we will give you the information you need to achieve the best results.

Pre and Post Botox Program

If you are considering Botox treatments to relieve pelvic floor pain, we recommend an evaluation before and after this procedure with our physical therapist.

This will help to further reduce muscle spasms and pelvic pain.

Therapy after the Botox injection is extremely helpful, as we are able to work out the pelvic floor muscles while they are in a more relaxed state.

Our physical therapists will also teach you techniques you can practice on your own to further reduce pelvic floor muscle tension.

Our physical therapists are also experts in bladder rehabilitation, as in some cases there is an additional underlying pelvic floor, orthopedic or behavioral component to your condition.

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